T-Mobile G1: Android Insights

T-Mobile G1 Android Google PhoneLuckily, I’m a member of the selected few bloggers who got one of the first T-Mobile G1 phones here Austria. While the device is already available in Great Britain and the UK, the market launch in Austria will take place in 2009, but there’s no specific date yet. During the next weeks I’ll blog about my experiences with this new geek toy – for starters, here’s an unboxing-video:

The first thing that comes to mind is a comparison with the iPhone – but I must say quite frankly that I could never use this phone, as it the lacks the keyboard I need though badly. That’s why I’m currently using a T-Mobile HTC MDA, which suits my mobile e-mailing needs much better. Luckily, the G1 has a built-in keyboard as well (the hardware is actually manufactured by HTC) which works quite well. Google doesn’t focus on entertainment, there’s only 256MB of built-in memory – it’s all about the operating system: Android is open source software. Instead of implementing a “single-point-of-software-sale” model (hello iStore), big G is relying on the creativity of the developer community. The number of available apps is quite low, since the device is so new – but this will probably change rapidly. I’m positively surprised on first impression, but I have yet do sync the device with my pc and try some apps.

One phone to bind them all

mobileblogger.at will go online soon – all postings will be aggregated on this site, and while most bloggers run German sites, there will also be some English reviews. Max, Michi, Luca, Peter, Helge, Robert, Martin, Georg and me got our phones yesterday. The official Feature-PDF is available on at T-Mobile US, I’m looking forwarding to testing the G1 under real live conditions – of course I’ll keep you updated.

Barcamp in Klagenfurt: My bags are packed

Barcamp Klagenfurt 2009Lookin’ forward to Barcamp Klagenfurt – it’s been a while since the last un-conference, and I’m expecting an international crowd: after all, Slovenia is very near, and I’m quite sure that some Swiss, Italian and German web entrepreneurs and bloggers will drop by. If you’ve never visited the city of the “Lindwurm” (a mythological dragon, the town’s landmark), there’s a good reason now to travel to Carinthia.

The actual Barcamp takes place during the weekend, but we will all hang out together on Friday – so it’s very likely quite a few folks will be hang-overed on Saturday, which is why I might consider doing my presentation on Sunday: I’m planning to speak about future micro-blogging scenarios and I will introduce my “3 twitter strategies”. The perfect chance to test Prezi under live conditions :mrgreen:

The participant list is 51 names long by now, I’m sure there will be at least 100 attendants. Of course the entry is free – it’s an unconference. If you want to join, just add your name to the list of participants in the Austrian Barcamp wiki. Big Shout-outs to Georg, Ed and all others involved in the organisation of this event!

Need a place to stay? Klagenfurt’s Youth Hostel not only offers very cheap accommodation (EUR 34,- for a single room), it’s also located very close by the university, where the BC takes place – reservations can be made via e-mail: Youth Hostel Klagenfurt.

Blog-Carnival: Best and worst gadget 2008

6fireA new year has just started and I’m happy to invite all my readers to datadirt’s first blog carnival: I’m curious about the new hardware you bought during the last year. Which shiny piece of technology is your favorite gadget, and which not-so-shiny one disappointed you? Feed the inner geek, write about satisfaction and disappointment. I’m sure that most of my readers experienced both scenarios, so let’s just share them and spread the knowledge :mrgreen:

Note: This carnival is also available in German on datenschmutz.net

This blog has received a nice 5 during the recent page rank update, so I’m more than happy to give some link juice back. The entrance is wide open: chose anything that might qualify as a “gadget”.

Rules: There are no rules – except for the fact that I will list all entries on this blog when the carnival is over, so please keep me updated about your entries either via trackback or via comment. The best/worst gadget 2008 blog carnival starts today, 12th of January, and ends in two weeks on Sunday the 25th of January.

I’m really looking forward to your entries – here’s my best and worst gadget selection:

My favorite gadget of 2008: Terratec 6fire USB

I’m quite satisfied with my new Samsung syncmaster screens, I love my Energy CB20 speakers and there’s plenty more gadgets that come to my mind. But there’s definitely a highlight: my new external soundcard Terratec 6fire USB is perfectly equipped for my needs and offers excellent sound quality. 6 analogue ins plus 6 outs in combination with the XLR microphone plug (including a switch for 48V phantom voltage for studio mics) guarantee versatility for all home-studio and podcasting needs.

The driver is stable (I’m running Vista64), the ASIO-latency is extremely low and the simple yet powerful software allows free routing of all available channels. Very good value for money – at Amazon, the soundcard ships for about 200 Euros. I don’t dub my vinyl, but thanks to the routing-per-channel features the 6Fire easily qualifies for digital djs and home-producers. Cinema freaks don’t need to switch soundcards, there’s a digital 5.1 out as well.

My worst gadget of 2008: Logitech Z-10 speaker system

z10Combining amplified speakers with a slick and elegant touch-screen display sounds like a brilliant idea – in theory. But I do not even want to know about the fun Logitech’s engineers had when declaring this piece of unfinished work: “Hey, we know that the touch-screen is not working well – who cares? There is not API or software anyways.” But that’s not even the worst part: the speakers use USB to transmit music, which is not such a bad idea after all for laptop use, but the big big problem is this: as soon as the speakers are connected, every kind of internal or external soundcard is deactivated. Now ain’t that great? I tried using the line-in, which renders all the additional touch screen functions useless and decreases the sound quality quite much. Since the product is way too heavy to qualify as a mobile laptop speaker, there’s not much us for the Z-10 in my opinion. The sound is not that bad for speakers of this size – but the money is much better spent on a pair of JBL control speakers.

But now for your gadget-stories of 2008. Looking forward to your postings!

Weekly Blogistan Round-Up no. 02/2009

tweetbacksNothing like listening to old-school dubstep mixes and surfing the net on a lazy Sunday afternoon – even though I have to admit that turning up the music is kind of my only option right now, since the new Samsung LCD screen I bought yesterday experiences some kind of identity crisis, confusing itself with some kind of alien sound-device by producing a constant annoying noise. But enough complaining, let’s turn our heads and look back on the 7 deadly sins of online-marketing compiled by Shoemoney.

Include the twitter juice!

Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a way to include tweets about your postings directly into the comment thread? tweetbacks by Smashing Magazine does just that:

This plug-in imports tweets about your posts as comments. You can display them in between the other comments on your blog, or display them separately.

The implementation requires a bit of template-fiddling, but the explanations outlines the necessary changes very well.

One for the Lohas

“My paper shredder cuts 100 sheets per minute!” “Mine only cuts 0,02 sheets per minute, but it’s hamster powered!” This fictional dialogue could soon become office reality, as London design consultant Tom Ballhatchet invented the prototype of a “Hamster Powered Paper Shredder”: it takes the little fellow about three quarters of an hour to tear one DIN A4 sheet to pieces, which then become his bedding – the Lauging Squid knows more.

Mind the Tweet?

In the last week, Twitter’s security loopholes have been discussed everywhere: tweeters are used to performance problems (“fail-whale”), but the recent hacks of popular accounts, among them Britney Spears and Barack Obama, created awareness for the basic problem: there is no Twitter API, most 3rd party mash-ups require you to gladly hand over your login to some total stranger. Nick O’Neill posted some interesting thoughts on allfacebook.com:

Why would developers build for a platform that has only a few million users when they can build identical tools for over 140 or 150 million users? Yes, Facebook can keep the statuses private, and all comment replies as well and theyll continue their phenomenal growth rate. They clearly dont have the development resources though to build tools around their status updates internally. If Facebook opened up statuses tomorrow, Twitter would essentially become a ghost town.

Video of the week: The 3 Rules of the Internet

A song is much easier to remember than a simple text – even heralds in medieval times were aware of that fact. And the same applies to this beautiful beautiful song by Jonathan Mann: “The internet is a less than physical space, containing a multitude of opinions on a wide variety of subjects… written by mostly assholes.” [via monochrom]
[youtube] http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GWSP2c9J8CQ[/youtube]

So that’s about it for this week – the New Year’s Eve aftermath has worn off (hopefully) and the blogosphere is buzzing again. Let’s see what 2k9 has in store – have a great Sunday, see you next week.

Input for weekly round-up

Got some news?

Got any news you’d like to read about in my weekly round-up of current blogosphere events?
Don’t hesitate to contact me! Of course I’ll include a backlink to your original story.

So don’t hesitate – just click here for the contact form and give me an update on your issues: Give me input!.

Weekly Blogistan Round-Up no. 01/2009

bewerbungHow you’re doing? I hope you had a great start into the new year, and believe me: 2k9 is gonna be a wicked year for web 2.0 folks, and I mean “wicked” in the good, old-school jungle way. I do have the impression that the European commercial community is just waking up, and I’m seriously looking forward to bigger budgets being spent on web 2.0 advertising as this will boost the whole scene. My personal 1st of January had a very nice surprise in stall for me: datadirt received a Pagerank update and is now proudly sporting a 5.

My German blog datenschmutz is now a member of the quite exclusive PR6 blogs club – this did not come totally unexpected though, yet I’m still really happy about it. Now I know that good ole PR neither reflects a real-time value nor is it the most relevant SEO factor: but I like to think like some kind of nice, expensive watch: no added value, but it looks nice and gives a great first impression :mrgreen:

So, what’s a super-affiliate again?

Super Affiliate is a stupid buzzword used in the affiliate marketing blogging community by bloggers who want to make you think they make more money or are somehow better than you. When I had my first $1000 week at one of the very well known affiliate networks, they said I was now a “Super Affiliate,” which showed me that it means absolutely nothing. Anyone using the term “Super Affiliate” in a non-joking manner, especially when referring to themselves, has no credibility, and is an idiot.

Says NickyCakes of Reformed Blackhat on Jeremy’s Blog That’s a short yet very concise way to put it – I have nothing to add :mrgreen:

Look back (in no anger)

Jeremy took the time to do a proper all-year review which is also a very smart idea in terms of internal pagerank distribution by the way.

TechCrunch und Twitter

TechCrunch publishes an article on a mash-up that forwards tweets to e-mail adresses. Asks Babou:

I really enjoy your blog for your insights and the posts of your team of writers but there is one thing: you really speak a lot about twitter.
Now I understand Twitter has become an important medium of communication but does it really deserve so much attention?

Well… that depends: I guess that twitter deserves all the attention that fits into 140 characters – a couple of times per day.

Video of the week

You don’t want to get that job? By all means, watch and learn from this brilliant job interview video by Ben Schwartz:

So much for the first weekly blogosphere review of the new year – as always, comments and feedback are highly appreciated. See you next week!

Input for weekly round-upGot any news you’d like to read about in my weekly round-up of current blogosphere events?
Don’t hesitate to contact me! Of course I’ll include a backlink to your original story.

So don’t hesitate – just click here for the contact form and give me an update on your issues: Give me input!.

Happy Christmas to you all!

“May the good luck / shine a light on you / may every song you sing / be ever with you!” Thanks a lot for constantly stopping by at my blog – I just started datadirt this year and I’m pretty amazed by all the feedback I got so far. I promise that I’ll keep things fresh and keep you folks updated about the latest in web 2.0 and online marketing. Thanks for your support, have great holidays! (And treat elks gently!)


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Weekly Blogistan Round-Up no. 52/2008

tangible interfacesReady from some good ole fun after the dreadful distress of buying all your X-Mas presents? Word your way through Dan’s list of Friday Funnies and meet the Tiddy bear! He’ll make you feel more comfortable than a pint of pure Christmas spirit or this weekly round-up. So sit back, relax and keep wondering about the miracles of modern web society.

Vote for your PPC, America

TechCrunch heard an interesting rumor: supposedly Digg is working on their own ad system by adding a social mechanism to determine the click price:

One experiment Digg is working on, says one source close to the company, is a self service advertising product that will be somewhat similar to Google AdWords, but with a twist. The product would insert advertisements into the Digg news stream (presumably clearly marked). Where those ads end up, and how much an advertiser pays per click, would be based on user feedback.

Sounds like a pretty smart plan – theoretically it might improve overall ad quality a lot. On the other hand I highly doubt that user are willing to cast their votes on ads. It’s much more likely that Digg-mobs embrace a more profitable kind of business model.

The key factors of success

If you want to become a millionaire, try to serve others first. If you offer them something of true value, the will appreciate your work and eventually pay your really good. Work through Crap:

C riticism
R ejection
A ssholes
P ressure


It’s all simple truths, cut down to a 3-minute TED presentation without any unnecessary bells and whistles. And there’s good news, too: try to have fun, will you? [via Blogpiloten]

In the mood for charity?

People usually are around this time of year and Seth has picked out some ideas like collecting money via twitter or getting peeps to sign up for some new service. That’s the true spirit of X-Mas: during other seasons you could never directly buy attention without looking like a complete loser, but hey, it’s Christmas: that seems to render any kind of begging and buying the G-love absolutely acceptable! Don’t worry though: I’ll just give some of my yearly income to charity, but I won’t ask you, my readers, to send me money or to sign up anywhere. If it was a successful year for you, pick some humanitarian cause that appeals to you. Give them some of money directly: finding a proper project is easier than ever before – there are literally millions of Facebook groups trying to improve the world, Africa, animal rights, human rights etc. I won’t and can’t tell you what good deed you should spend your hard-earned bucks on.

Video(s) of the week: tangible interaction

Tangible Interaction’s graffiti wall takes the illegal part out of spraying house-walls. The only problem is that these interfaces are probably far too expensive to be put up on every city wall. Still, using them looks like a lot of fun:

And there’s more greatness on Vimeo: Scott Beale of Laughing Squid test-drove his brand-new Canon 5D Mark II against mighty Doc Popular’s Yoyo tricks: the sequence is short, but watch it in HD on Vimeo and behold the incredible video quality:

So much for this week – one more round-up to go, and we’re done with 2008 or “the year of 140 letters” as some like to call it. So good luck with grabbing your last-minute X-mas presents, have a nice Sunday and great holidays, see you next week.


Input for weekly round-upGot any news you’d like to read about in my weekly round-up of current blogosphere events?
Don’t hesitate to contact me! Of course I’ll include a backlink to your original story.

So don’t hesitate – just click here for the contact form and give me an update on your issues: Give me input!.

My German blog ranks #44 in Twingly’s charts

Twingly ChartsThis week, Swedish Start-up Company Twingly launched its very own top-blog lists in twelve different languages. Their blog search is delivering really good results, so it seems that the near future might look rather bleak for Technorati – and the best part is that my main blog datenschmutz ranks #44 in the German-language list!

The overall winner of the new rating is – what a surprise – Technorati. And this is what Michael, or in this case Robin, thinks about the new charts:

Twingly, the social blog search engine that prides itself in being completely spam-free, has launched BlogRank as a way to identify the 100 most important blogs in 12 different languages based on a proprietary ranking system. Its very similar to what Technorati has been trying to achieve with their Authority ranking, i.e. creating a Google PageRank for blogs. […] They also stress that it shows the blogosphere according to their data, and that its not necessarily 100% accurate. Its a nice feature, but late in the game, and youve got to ask yourself how obsolete both Twingly’s and Technorati’s ranking would be if Google were actually the next to introduce the next ‘Google PageRank for blogs’.

The ratings are based on the so called Twingly blog-rank:

Twingly Top 100, is the listing of the 100 biggest blogs in 12 different languages based on our ranking system (which is mainly focusing on inlinks and likes among other things). BlogRank is a number between 1-10 that shows how big a blog is. Its similar to Google PageRank but only for blogs.

I have to agree – but the question is if and when Google will launch such a specialized PageRank. Sooner or later they will be forced to do so, as the rapid dynamics of blogs calls for a different measurement, otherwise the main index will become too clogged over time. But until then, I’m very very happy about number 44, especially considering that I’m writing about a growing, yet still pretty small niche compared to e.g. tabloid or pop culture blogs.

Why the name datadirt?

I started datadirt only a couple of months ago, but I’ve been blogging in German for some years – that’s actually where the name of the blog comes from. My German blog is called datenschmutz, which is a wordplay, as the German term for privacy protection is “Datenschmutz”, while Schmutz literally means dirt. So datadirt is the literal translation of the name – I got so used to it that I decided to stick with the name. Of course I’m not translating every single posting, but I really like blogging in two languages; brushes up my written English and enables me to blog about topics which are hot in the US but not in Europe. Take affiliate marketing for example: some of the best and most lucrative networks out there only accept English sites, as the network owners want to keep track of their affiliate portfolio. Very understandable, but still a drag if you only operate German sites. So to cut a long story short: thanks for your support – and I hope datadirt will turn up in Twigly’s English list next year – so thanks a lot for you interest and your support!